Friday, August 1, 2014

When I Am King


Two more Weft 1401, because I am on a roll with this pattern. These ones have both gotten much more wear than the yellow version, simply because I don't have to worry about what my body is doing below the waist seam. (Also, this text reeally doesn't want to left justify, so we're changing up the format today on Weft, guys.)

The fabric is Michael Miller, called When I Am King. Isn't that the best name? It reminds me a tiny bit of Max's crown from Where the Wild Things Are. 


Why are clothes so much easier to photograph when I'm not wearing them. Sigh.


Then, of course, we have version three, made up in this absolutely jaw-droppingly gorgeous linen I have been hoarding away for months. For this one I used facings instead of binding the neck and armscye, which was a struggle and a half. I got a bit hasty with the construction, but trying to do an all-in-one facing is tricky business. I ended up scrapping one method, unpicking a bunch, and trying it this way.



You can tell how pleased I am when I break out the model poses. 


Shot of the back, where the waist seams match up quite nicely indeed. The print was thankfully busy enough that I didn't need to worry all that much about pattern matching. I'm really not sure I would have had enough fabric for it. 
Next up: an Archer shirt that will be beautiful if it decides to cooperate with my cheapo iron and even cheaper ironing board. Currently, it's decided to pick up the metal lattice design from underneath the cushioning on the board. Colour me displeased.

Monday, July 14, 2014

Maple Keys

So I finally made a wearable version of this bodice. I don't yet have a name for the pattern, or rather, I have several and just haven't made up my mind. Originally I intended it to be a peplum shirt, which can be taken as a reminder to always test your pattern pieces before you sew them up. It turned out very fitted throughout, meaning it's probably not the best choice for a thanksgiving dinner, but I kind of like it anyway. 


This version is made up in Dear Stella print cotton. I normally sew with fashion fabrics, but recently I was inspired to buy some nifty cotton prints by all of the colourful craziness going on for Sew Dolly Clackett, and of course Roisin's entire wardrobe. I have a philosophy about fabrics in general: the drapier the fabric, the looser the fit can be. It works the other way too; if I'm going to use something stiff, like quilter's cotton, the garment has to be fitted. Otherwise it just stands out from the body in all the places I don't want it to. I'm so excited to have a pattern that works so well in cotton, so I can make a bunch of versions in all the prints my heart desires.

Here's the back, which could have stood for a little less length, I see that now.


Those wrinkles aren't going to stop me from wearing it, but they could have been avoided. Though this shouldn't be a problem with a looser skirt, since the waistband doesn't actually sit below my waist. I'm actually quite pleased with the zipper insertion here, I tried lining up the zipper based on the waist seams, and I think it worked.


I already have another, made up in true peplum style with a half-circle skirt. Peplum. Peplum skirt. Whatever you call it. Soon to come may also be a dress version in a gorgeous Dutch wax print I found at Affordable Textiles.




Sunday, April 20, 2014

Paisley Sheets and Chocolate Eggs

Happy Spring everyone! Hope you're making the best of this long weekend. Here's a bit of photographic evidence of my latest adventure in flat pattern-making, which has been roughly a week from first design to final pattern. It's only a bodice so far, but I have several skirt patterns that could be easily adapted so I may not bother drafting my own.



Yes. I label my patterns. Mark of a proper sewing nerd. 

Sunday, April 13, 2014

Sunday Briar

And for my back-to-bloggin debut (cough cough again) I give you my wearable muslin for Megan Nielsen's Briar Tee:




This went together really nicely. I think I cut a medium, but I deliberately sized up because it printed small and I was too lazy and cheap to print out a whole second copy. Next time I'm double checking that little measurement box before printing out the whole thing.

Despite the whole pattern being slightly small, the fit is absolutely fine. The whole project, cutting and sewing, took a couple of hours, so it's pretty quick to put together. I'm still figuring out exactly how the neckband goes in; this one's a tad too loose at the center front, and gapes when I hunch my shoulders, but hey, nobody's perfect. I used the classic t-shirt neckband instead of the binding, and top-stitched around the edges just below the seam for a more stable, professional look.


The dipped hem is an interesting feature, not sure if I'll make it that way every time. I was surprised at how long the shirt actually is in the back. I'm thinking of making the dip much shallower, or switching to a tab hem. Love me a good tab hem.


Works great with the sleeves pulled up too, which is an absolute must for me. The first thing I do when I get too warm is to roll up my sleeves.


Side view: it's a bit baggy from this angle, I must admit. Combined with a medium-weight heather-grey knit, the whole thing comes off a bit pajama-esque. I figure I'll mostly be wearing this around the house or up north, for lazy days. The hem also makes it perfect for wearing with thick, cozy leggings. Add slippers and a mug of something hot, and it's beyond perfect for the last few cold days we're getting here before spring really kicks in.


I've cut out another one already, a short-sleeved version in bright purple. Who else is getting their summer sewing projects on the go already?

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

Floral Denim Maritime Shorts

I did a lot of making things this past month, and now I finally have a camera so I can show them to you! It's quite exciting. You may want to take a minute to mentally prepare. No? Just me?

First August make, and the one that got the most wear out and about, were my Maritime Shorts.



Okay so when I say finished object I really mean finished with a safety pin instead of a button. So sue me.
Actually, I think this is a recurring problem of mine. The longer I've been working on a project, and the closer I am to finishing it, the more my enthusiasm slows down. So, by the time I'm nearing the finish line, I usually end up wearing my makes slightly unfinished. And then never getting around to finishing them. Pretty much all of my knit garments go unhemmed at the bottom because I'm lazy. Heh heh.

What is this back poof thing? Aliens in my pants?


The pockets peek out a little, not sure if I should care about that. I have bought shorts in stores where the pockets peek out on purpose, but it feels a little... indecent. I dunno. E likes it.


I love Jen's pockets, they come out so clean! I left off the topstitching across the pocket altogether; the print is already busy enough, it felt unnecessary. I hand-stitched the cuffs with a catchstitch, and I quite like the rolled-up look. Of course, to do this, I needed to lengthen the pattern by a couple inches, and even then they are quite short.

And, since I haven't been all that present on the blog, and since I can't seem to take a decent picture of my face at all today, I leave you with a special present: a peek at my partner, who's been alluded to in the about section...

E and me being all cute and gross

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

All the Pretty Things

My absence from this blog will briefly be interrupted by some gorgeous applique thinger-ma-bobbers I just found on Etsy:

Etsy shop: RavioleeDreams

Wednesday, July 3, 2013

Heart-Back Hawthorn

Shoes from Dolce Vita

I made a Hawthorn! You guys, this pattern is lovely. I made a few aesthetic adjustments, but in terms of fit I only took an inch off the back bodice, and everything else fit perfectly. I cut a straight size 6.



 The fabric is some really drapey rayon-type stuff I found in Toronto's little fashion district, at Queen West and Spadina. As it turns out, all of the Fabriclands in Toronto proper have been closing down, and this is really the only place left in the city to buy fabric. I'm slowly making the transition to online shopping, though it makes me a little nervous to buy fabric without feeling it first.


 It's so swishy! Love the cut, and the half circle skirt. And I am such a sucker for shirtdresses. And now, for the best part: the back!



Heart cut-out that I can still wear a bra with? Yes please!

I made quite a few changes to the design and construction, both to accommodate the cut-out, and just because I wanted to.
1. The bodice is lined, not faced. I hate facings with a fiery passion.
2. I inserted a yoke, which allowed me to remove the back waist darts.
3. The cut-out, obviously.
4. Took off the collar. I like it a lot on the model, but it was too much going on. Also, I was afraid it would cover up the lovely cut-out.

Some fudging re-imagining of the instructions was needed for all the changes I made, but overall the instructions were really helpful. This dress was as satisfying to make as it is to wear. I've got mental plans for a future tunic-length Hawthorn in plaid, maybe from a few thrifted men's shirts? It would also be fun to add a bunch of godets to the skirt, for maximum twirlyness.

So, who else has their eye on this pattern? Made it already? Thinking of entering the Hawthorn contest or participating in the sewalong? Let me know in the comments!



[listening to Wade In The Water by Eva Cassidy]